Journal ID : CJOHNS-24-05-2024-11449
[This article belongs to Volume - 55, Issue - 06]

Title : THE INDICATORS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AND ANXIETY IN PATIENTS HAVING HEAD & NECK SURGERY: IMPACTS ON QUALITY OF LIFE

Abstract :

The purpose of this study was to determine the psychological symptoms experienced by surgical patients with head and neck cancer as well as potential indicators of anxiety and depression symptoms. The variations in HADS scores between the preoperative and 6-month postoperative stages were subjected to analysis of variance with multiple measurements, with a significance level of p = 0.05. The study comprised 47 individuals with head and neck cancer who underwent surgery between 2023 and 2024. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), a screening tool for anxiety and depression, was used to collect assessments before surgery and up to six months after surgery. SPSS 23 was used to analyze the data. A univariate analysis was conducted. The variations in HADS scores between the preoperative and 6-month postoperative stages were subjected to analysis of variance with multiple measurements, with a significance level of p = 0.05. The most common psychological symptoms reported by 34% of respondents were distress, followed by anxiety (44.6%) and depression (12.7%). Age (p = 0.04), primary site (p = 0.000), and marital status (p = 0.042) were the three factors with significant differences in the univariate analysis between HADS score and each factor at 6 months postoperatively. Age differences were found to be significant (p = 0.04) in the results. The median HADS values before surgery were 11 (6.5–16), 11 (6–14), and 9 (5.5–15.5), accordingly, as were the outcomes at three and six months after surgery. It is concluded that patients whose mouth is the major location of malignancies who are undergoing surgery may be at a higher risk of developing post-operative anxiety and depression and also compromised quality of life.

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