Journal ID : CJOHNS-23-06-2024-11461
[This article belongs to Volume - 55, Issue - 06]

Title : THE PREVALENCE OF MALNUTRITION IN CHILDREN YOUNGER THAN FIVE YEARS OLD AND ITS CORRELATION WITH MORTALITY

Abstract :

This case-control analysis was done to investigate the prevalence of malnutrition in children under the age of five and its link to mortality, as malnutrition is frequent in developing countries. A case-control study was conducted in the pediatrics department of the BGC Trust Medical College Hospital, Chattogram City Corporation Memon Maternity Hospital, Bangladesh, and other settings in Pakistan for six months, from November 2023 to April 2024. All hospitalized pediatric emergency unit patients between the ages of one month and twelve years were included in the investigation. The cases were then divided into two groups based on the severity of the malnutrition: mild to moderate and severe malnutrition. Stunting or chronic malnutrition was taken into consideration if the height-to-age ratio was less than 90% of the predicted value and the weight-to-height ratio was normal. The 14-element PRISM score was administered to all patients within 24 hours of their hospital stay. 26% of the patients had normal weights for their ages and were classified as cases; the remaining 69% were classified as controls. Major systems were found to be similarly implicated in cases and controls; however, among patients receiving mechanical ventilation, malnutrition was more common, and statistically significant (p < 0.003), and nearly all of these patients had underlying congenital heart problems. Additional mortality was examined in various groups of malnutrition, i.e., among mild to moderate and severe grades of malnutrition, and found that the seriously malnourished group had a significantly higher mortality rate (p-value 0.000) than the marginally malnourished children. The PRISM values of children who were mild to moderately emaciated to highly undernourished, as well as among cases and controls, were not different significantly. The factors in the PRISM score and the individual's mortality are highly influenced by the nutritional state or growth characteristics.

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